Law Offices of Hussain & Gutierrez
Free Initial Consultation
818-646-6935
888-997-3701

blog Archives

Amputation from workplace accident puts life on hold

There are three kinds of people on the job site. One kind of worker thinks an accident will never happen to them and others know it's just a matter of time. No matter which kind of those two workers you were before, you are now in the third category: injured. A moment of inattention, a piece of faulty equipment or a safety procedure ignored has now cost you a limb.

Medical professionals have highest rate of workplace injuries

You may laugh when you watch medical dramas on TV. The nurses, assistants and aids in immaculate scrubs and perfect hair may spend an entire episode sitting at the bedside of a single patient or wandering around the halls with a cup of coffee and a heartbroken co-worker. You know this is rarely the case, especially in a hospital setting, and you likely have the blisters and bruises to prove it.

Will your legal status keep you from getting workers' comp?

When you go to work each day, do you try your best to avoid attention and simply carry out your duties in the hope that you'll make it safely back to your home without any problems? There are many other undocumented immigrants in California who relate to your current situation. Living as a non-citizen in the United States is especially challenging if you're trying to raise a family in the process. Where your job is concerned, you may worry about getting help if you get injured.

Going to the chapel to get married doesn't guarantee legal status

Perhaps you are among many others in California who mistakenly believed that by marrying a U.S. citizen, you'd automatically become one yourself. By the time you learned that information was not factual, you may have already found yourself in a precarious situation. Do you remain undocumented and hope for the best? It's been duly noted that not only is this illegal, it's typically a very bad idea for many other reasons as well.

Employing non-U.S. citizens in your California business

As a California business owner or manager, you may encounter a time when you need someone with a particular expertise. Your search for the right person may lead you outside the United States, and you need to know whether you can bring that individual into the country to work.

Should you document your workplace injury if you're undocumented?

Do you know at least 10 out of every 100 workers in the United States are undocumented immigrants? In fact, immigrants without legitimate residency statuses comprise nearly 4 percent of the nation's population. Obviously, many of these millions of people earn incomes through gainful employment. Immigrant workers are just like any other workers in America, some have jobs in labor industries and others have business careers. Also just like many other employees throughout the nation, many immigrant workers are at risk for injury on the job.

Rectifying problem situations regarding immigrant legal statuses

Perhaps you're one of many immigrants who have been living in California for decades. Since arriving in this nation, you obtained a college degree, acquired gainful employment and are well on your way to saving enough money to put a down payment on the house you hope to purchase. Throughout recent years, as you made plans for your future in the United States, a particular issue has been nagging at your heart, mostly because you worry what the outcome will be if you try to resolve it: You're undocumented.

Should an undocumented California worker document a work injury?

You came to California some time ago. You escaped imminent danger and extreme poverty in your country of origin. Since then, you managed to build a healthy, successful life here for yourself and your family; yet, each year continues to bring challenges and worry because you remain undocumented. Perhaps part of your concern pertains to your job. What if you get injured in a workplace accident? How might your status affect your ability to seek medical attention or receive workers' compensation benefits? 

How can I marry my non-U.S. citizen fiance?

If you are a citizen of the United States, regardless of whether you were born in Asia, the Middle East, India or another foreign country, you may want to bring your fiancé to the United States to be married. With the necessary knowledge, legal support and guidance, you can achieve this and then work on getting your new spouse's permanent residency arranged, which would enable you to build a future in California.

Email Us For A Response

Speak with an Attorney

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy