OSHA rules require most companies in California and throughout the country to record any injury that results in a person seeking medical treatment other than basic first aid. Furthermore, they must record injuries that cause a person to lose consciousness or to miss time from work. If an individual has to be transferred to a new job or be put on restricted duty, his or her injury must be recorded.

These rules apply regardless of why any of these criteria were met, and the rules also apply regardless of a company’s previous safety record. Therefore, an employer must record a serious injury even if it hasn’t had any in the past or don’t have a track record of serious injuries on its premises. It is important to note a company might have to log injuries that occur outside of an office or warehouse location.

For example, if an employee was hurt while working from home or while on a business trip, it may need to be logged. Furthermore, it generally doesn’t matter if an individual was a full-time, part-time or seasonal worker when he or she was injured on the job. Failing to report serious injuries to OSHA could result in an organization incurring fines or other significant penalties.

Individuals who are victims of workplace injuries might be entitled to compensation for medical bills and lost wages. They might find it advisable to have the assistance of an experienced workers’ compensation in order to ensure that the required claim contains all necessary information and that it is filed on a timely basis.